Conspiracy suggests King Charles’ bodyguard has wrong hands

give him a hand

King Charles III’s “sausage hands” aren’t the only royal gloves raising eyebrows online.

A bizarre video of the new monarch’s bodyguard holding his hands in an odd position has sparked a bizarre new conspiracy theory that his karate choppers are fake. Clips spreading the wild guess are currently getting millions of views on TikTok as viewers debate whether the security detail’s gloves are real.

“King Charles Security, have some fake guns?” @jace_the_ace_ posits in one of the controversial videos with 27.4 million views. The accompanying clip shows footage that surfaced last week of King Charles III, 73, strolling around the grounds outside Buckingham Palace with his security team in tow.

The clip then zooms in on the man to King Charles III’s left, his “good” equerry Major Johnny Thompson, holding his hands together so stationary they look like a wax figure.

“The man on the left, the hand he’s holding looks suspicious,” explains the TikTok conspiracy theorist. “It looks like it’s inanimate.”

The clip then cuts to a larger white haired man posing with his left fist clenched while the right one is open and dangling, leading @jace_the_ace to speculate that his left arm is “fake”. The TikToker found it particularly suspicious that the man’s hand didn’t move, even though his arm swung as he walked. A third picture showed a bulge in the man’s left jacket pocket, believed to be a firearm.

In another video posted by @kevhead22 which has racked up 4.8million views, one of King Charles’ bodyguards can be seen adopting the same motionless position with his hands stacked as he greets the sovereign on a stroll outside Cardiff Castle accompanied. The caption reads, “What’s wrong with the bodyguard’s hands?”

Needless to say, the TikTok commentary had their own theories, with some speculating that the hands were actually decoys to distract criminals while their real mittens held their guns ready.

Bodyguards accompany King Charles III outside Buckingham Palace.

Bodyguards accompany King Charles III outside Buckingham Palace.


A closeup of a bodyguard's clasped hands.

A closeup of a bodyguard’s clasped hands.


TikTok conspiracy theorists postulate that the hands of King Charles III's bodyguards  are actually fake.

TikTok conspiracy theorists postulate that the hands of King Charles III’s bodyguards are fake.


“In case the real hand is already on his gun,” said one online conspiracy theorist, while another wrote, “That’s because he’s an armed guard, his real hand is in his jacket holding the gun.” , this is neither new nor a secret. ”

A bodyguard added: “Intelligence agencies do this in America too. prop hands. Your real hand is on a loaded gun under your jacket.”

“The right arm is real, the left is fake so it can conceal a weapon on standby,” said another.

A poster found it suspicious that this bodyguard's hand did not change position even while walking.
A poster found it suspicious that this bodyguard’s hand did not change position even while walking.
TikTok / @jase_the_ace_
Upcoming tinfoil hat makers on TikTok theorized that the bodyguards possessed baited hands to distract would-be assassins, while their actual mittens held their guns ready.
TikTok theorized that the bodyguards possessed decoy hands to distract would-be assassins, while their actual mittens held their guns ready.
TikTok / @jase_the_ace_

However, security experts have since dismissed this false hand theory.

“These are definitely not wrong hands,” Will Geddes, a former bodyguard with 30 years of experience, told Metro. “I can understand why some people might think it was because of an incredibly tight grip, but they definitely aren’t.”

He added: “It’s not a tactic used in the UK at all, there could be all sorts of other tricks and stunts security officials use to make sure high profile people are safe, but this wouldn’t be one of them. “

The former security service concluded with the cheeky quip that while counterfeit gloves “could be used in the US, where they tend to be deductible”, they are not used in the UK.

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