“SNL” awards the Roe v. Wade a medieval perspective

NBC’s Saturday Night Live went way back in time to explain why the US Supreme Court is poised to overturn Roe v Wade.

The show began with a reenactment of a passage from a 13th-century British treatise cited by Judge Samuel Alito in his leaked draft opinion on the case.

Host Benedict Cumberbatch and cast members James Austin Johnson and Andrew Dismukes portrayed royals who wrote the medieval anti-abortion law.

“We should make a law that stands the test of time so they look back hundreds and hundreds of years and give no reason to even change that, they nailed it,” said English actor Cumberbatch.

Women who flouted the abortion ban would be forced to take a ship from the end of the world or have sex with a donkey dressed up as their husband, the nobles ruled.

Cecily Strong played a farmer who asked why punishing abortion was a top priority.

“I don’t understand why everyone is obsessed with this topic. Nobody can read or write and everyone dies from the plague,” she said.

In another current affairs nod, Dismukes refused to wear a mask despite suffering from the infectious disease which wiped out 20 million Europeans.

“My body, my choice,” he said.

The show began with a reenactment of a passage from a 13th-century British treatise cited by Judge Samuel Alito in his leaked draft opinion on the case.
The show began with a reenactment of a passage from a 13th-century British treatise cited by Judge Samuel Alito in his leaked draft opinion on the case.
Saturday Night Live / Youtube

Cumberbatch made several references to his new film Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness in his monologue.

“They present me with sketches every day, most of them with Doctor Strange,” said the 45-year-old, noting that he was nominated for an Oscar for Power of the Dog, a movie that “nobody has seen.” was nominated for best actor.

Cumberbatch kicked off the Mother’s Day episode with a heartfelt tribute to his wife and mother, before joking that being a mother isn’t as hard as opening portals in Marvel’s multiverse.

In the first post-monologue sketch, Aidy Bryant played a mother who was given a series of tacky, knick-knack wooden signs from her extended family.

“Having a mother-in-law is like having crabs,” read one sign.

“Is there more on the back?” asked Bryant’s character. “It feels like they haven’t finished the joke.”

Other characters joked about an allegedly serious case of maternal alcoholism.

“Oh god it’s wine clock I just love watching the sun rise,” read one.

“I only drink on days ending in Y and hours that have numbers,” read another.

“I don’t drink that much,” a surprised Bryant scolded her kids, husband and in-laws.

An ice cream tasting focus group turned dramatic when two of the participants (Cumberbatch and Heidi Gardner) gave their feedback in the form of romantic self-talk before eventually falling in love.

Cumberbatch and Heidi Gardner gave their feedback in the form of romantic monologues during an ice cream tasting that turned dramatic.
Cumberbatch and Heidi Gardner gave their feedback in the form of romantic monologues during an ice cream tasting that turned dramatic.
Saturday night live

The Mother’s Day humor continued when Strong berated 17-year-old daughter Chloe Fineman for coming home drunk, although flashbacks revealed her teenage years were spent throwing up at parties, drunk driving and having sex with football players to the soundtrack of Chumbawamba’s “Tubthumping”.

The misdeeds were revealed to have spanned several generations when strict grandmother Kate McKinnon was spotted throwing her underwear at David Bowie in the ’70s.

The skit ended with a cute catchphrase: “You may not have been a perfect person, but you are a perfect mom.”

“Weekend Update” devoted most of the fake news segment to the Roe v Wade decision that was leaked by “a bad apple”.

“A bad apple is also another legal argument used in Alito’s mind,” snapped Colin Jost, as an over-the-shoulder graphic depicted Adam and Eve’s illegal apple tree.

Michael Che said an abortion ban would disproportionately hit poor people.

“Most Americans don’t have access to the same resources that I do,” Che said.

“I mean, the average person can’t just text [‘SNL’ Executive Producer] Lorne [Michaels] in the middle of the night and think, ‘It happened again,'” he joked.

McKinnon sat on the announcer’s desk as Judge Amy Coney Barrett and asked questions about the court’s decision.

“I listened to the case with an open mind and asked all my questions,” she said, citing a unique concern about safe haven laws.

“You can leave a baby anywhere in the United States, so what’s the big deal? Just pop it,” said McKinnon-as-Barrett.

McKinnon sat on the announcer's desk as Judge Amy Coney Barrett and asked questions about the court's decision.
McKinnon sat on the announcer’s desk as Judge Amy Coney Barrett and asked questions about the court’s decision.
Saturday night live

A spoof of an aristocratic British television drama featured Strong as a woman extremely prone to fainting, repeatedly damaging Fabergé eggs and china dishes while kicking her butler’s drinks tray.

When Cumberbatch also fainted at the sight of her blood, it turned out that the whole family suffered from the disease due to centuries of inbreeding.

In a brief fake commercial, Cumberbatch usurped the conventions of a stuffy boarding school when he showed students how to use the bathroom in the comfort of a lavatory.

Benedict Cumberbatch played a role in a fake commercial promoting the world's first lying toilet on the show.
Benedict Cumberbatch played a role in a fake commercial promoting the world’s first lying toilet on the show.
Saturday night live

Cumberbatch and Bowen Yang have reunited their 1983 New Order-esque avant-garde new wave band to provide inappropriate entertainment for kids at Chuck E. Cheese in a third straight skit that dubs British culture .

Fineman revealed that she’s actually “The Understudy” for cast members who can’t do the show when they’re ill, giving her a chance to snap impressions of castmates McKinnon, Strong and Melissa Villaseñor.

Perpetually absent cast member Pete Davidson was again absent from the show, which returned live after a three-week hiatus.

Montreal’s Arcade Fire received the rare three-song treatment, performing their songs “Unconditional I (Lookout Kid)” and “The Lightning I” from their new album We. They ended the show with “End of The Empire I-III” instead of the house band’s signature closing music.

Singer Selena Gomez is set to host SNL next week with musical guest Post Malone.

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